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Видео добавленное пользователем “Brigham and Women's Hospital”
Vitamin D: The Miracle Supplement Video - Brigham and Women's Hospital
 
03:31
Could Vitamin D be the miracle supplement? Brigham and Womens Hospital research indicates that Vitamin D may help defeat asthma in children, hip fractures in adults and maybe a whole lot more.
Просмотров: 40591 Brigham and Women's Hospital
Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy Video - Brigham and Women's Hospital
 
09:49
Weight loss surgery performed by laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy, for morbidly obese patients, is demonstrated by Dr.Scott Shikora, Director Metabolic Health and Bariatric Surgery at Brigham and Women's Hospital. During the weight loss surgery, the outer crescent of the stomach is removed, leaving behind a stomach shaped like a tube which can hold three to five ounces of food. Patients lose 50 to 65% of excess body weight and experience other health benefits including a reduction in blood pressure and less joint pain. The Center for Metabolic Health and Bariatric Surgery (CMHBS) at Brigham and Women's Hospital is a full service, comprehensive Level 1A Center of Excellence accredited Bariatric Center with the American College of Surgeons. Visit the Center for Metabolic Health and Bariatric Surgery: http://www.brighamandwomens.org/Departments_and_Services/surgery/metabolic-and-bariatric-surgery/default.aspx View our New Patient Information video to learn whether bariatric surgery makes sense for you. In this video you will learn about the types of surgical procedures that are available, nutrition and lifestyle changes that are necessary before and after surgery, insurance and financial issues related to bariatric surgery, and how to take the next steps. View the New Patient Information video: http://www.brighamandwomens.org/weightlosssurgeryclass
Просмотров: 407234 Brigham and Women's Hospital
Matt's Story - From End-Stage Heart Failure to Recovery Video - Brigham and Women's Hospital
 
05:38
Matt Fogg, 23, was near death when he arrived at our Heart & Vascular Center. After implanting a left ventricular assist device (LVAD) to normalize his heart function, Matt's medical team began a rehab program to thoroughly restore his heart. Matt now enjoys a healthy, independent life without the aid of a LVAD. Learn more about Brigham and Women's Heart & Vascular Center: www.brighamandwomens.org/heart
Просмотров: 17274 Brigham and Women's Hospital
Basal and Squamous Cell Skin Cancers: Treatment including Mohs Surgery Video - Brigham and Women’s
 
07:20
Chrysalyne D. Schmults, MD, MSCE, Director, Mohs and Dermatologic Surgery Center at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Director, High-Risk Skin Cancer Clinic at Dana Farber/Brigham and Women’s Cancer Center discusses the prevalence of non-melanoma (basal cell and squamous cell) skin cancer and treatment options for patients, including Mohs surgery. Mohs surgery, a form of skin cancer removal in which the borders are examined by the surgeon microscopically while the patient waits, boasts a remarkable 99% cure rate for most basal and squamous cell skin cancers as well as a high cure rate for other rare forms of skin cancer. Since very little normal tissue is removed during the treatment, our surgeons are able to reconstruct most wounds with excellent cosmetic results. When surgical removal is not necessary, our Center also offers cream and other topical treatments for superficial skin cancers. Our Mohs Dermatologic Surgery Center located at Brigham and Women’s Faulkner Hospital offers highly specialized outpatient treatment of skin cancer with excellent outcomes. Learn more at: http://www.brighamandwomens.org/
Просмотров: 38193 Brigham and Women's Hospital
Nanoparticles for Cancer Treatment Video - Brigham and Women's Hospital
 
02:37
Nanoparticles have a unique ability to target cancer cells and wipe out tumors. At Brigham and Womens Hospital, development of these new technologies holds tremendous promise for cancer treatment.
Просмотров: 19447 Brigham and Women's Hospital
John Peck Bilateral Arm Transplant Patient Video - Brigham and Women's Hospital
 
03:18
Watch a video about Retired Marine Sergeant John Peck. John is recipient of a bilateral arm transplant at Brigham and Women's Hospital. John, 31, became a quad amputee in 2010 when he stepped on an Improvised Explosive Device in Afghanistan during his second tour of duty and shares his story. Learn more about arm and hand transplantation at Brigham and Women’s Hospital: http://www.brighamandwomens.org/About_BWH/publicaffairs/news/HandTransplant/armhand.aspx
Просмотров: 31311 Brigham and Women's Hospital
Permanent Pacemaker Discharge Instructions Video - Brigham and Women's Hospital
 
08:28
This video shows discharge instructions for patients with permanent pacemakers from Brigham and Women's Hospital.
Просмотров: 12868 Brigham and Women's Hospital
Impact of Sleep on Health Video -- Brigham and Women's Hospital
 
06:29
Charles A. Czeisler, MD, PhD, Chief, Division of Sleep and Circadian Disorders at Brigham and Women's Hospital, explains the impact of sleep on brain function and physical health. During sleep, the brain is flushed of toxins and learning experiences are consolidated. Inadequate sleep can impair physical health including a dampening of the immune response, disruption in hormones that regulate weight, reduction in the effectiveness of insulin metabolism and an increased risk for calcification of the arteries. Dr. Czeisler also describes how artificial light exposure can cause our circadian rhythms to be disrupted resulting in shortened sleep cycles or insomnia. Learn more about the Division of Sleep and Circadian Disorders at Brigham and Women's Hospital: http://www.brighamandwomens.org/sleep Read our blog posts about sleep: http://healthhub.brighamandwomens.org/category/sleep
Просмотров: 5333 Brigham and Women's Hospital
Understanding Polycystic Ovary Syndrome Video – Brigham and Women’s Hospital
 
06:05
Margo S. Hudson, MD, Co-director, Polycystic Ovary Syndrome Program in the Fish Center for Women’s Health at Brigham and Women’s Hospital describes causes, symptoms and treatment for polycystic ovary syndrome. Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a group of symptoms rather than a specific disease. While the ovaries may develop cysts, that is not necessary for the diagnosis of PCOS. Many patients who have PCOS are overweight or obese. It is one of the most common hormonal and reproductive conditions in young women, affecting approximately one in every 15 women. The primary cause of PCOS may be due to abnormal production of certain hormones in the brain. This disruption leads to an increase in the production of male hormones, such as testosterone, and inhibition of ovulation. The most common symptom of PCOS is irregular menstrual cycles. Other symptoms include acne, cardiovascular disease, excessive body hair (particularly facial hair), infertility, insulin resistance or pre-diabetes, obesity, polycystic ovaries, and scalp hair loss. Because women with PCOS can exhibit a variety of symptoms, care is designed to meet the specific needs of each patient. Treatment is tailored according to the particular symptoms experienced by each patient. Medical therapies are often used to regulate menstrual cycles, reduce testosterone levels, lower insulin levels, improve insulin sensitivity, and eliminate unwanted hair growth. Nutrition education will help reduce excess weight, and psychological support can help reduce stress. Located at the Gretchen S. and Edward A. Fish Center for Women’s Health in the Brigham and Women’s Health Care Center in Chestnut Hill, the Polycystic Ovary Syndrome Program brings together experts in gynecology, endocrinology, dermatology, nutrition, and other specialties to deliver comprehensive, individualized, and coordinated care for women with PCOS. Learn more about the Polycystic Ovary Syndrome Program at Brigham and Women’s Hospital: http://www.brighamandwomens.org/pcos Read the Understanding Polycystic Ovary Syndrome video transcript: http://www.brighamandwomens.org/Departments_and_Services/womenshealth/ConnorsCenter/FishCenter/understanding-polycystic-ovary-syndrome-video-transcript.aspx
Просмотров: 59713 Brigham and Women's Hospital
Research Updates: Amyloid Beta & Alzheimer’s Disease Video - Brigham and Women’s Hospital
 
07:05
Dennis J. Selkoe, MD, Co-director of the Ann Romney Center for Neurologic Diseases at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, discusses progress in the development of Alzheimer’s disease treatments that target the amyloid beta protein. Alzheimer's disease is a very complex disorder of the thinking part of the brain. Alzheimer disease symptoms include a gradual loss of memory and other aspects of cognitive function over the course of five to twenty years. Alzheimer disease symptoms seem to be due to the buildup of a protein in the brain referred to as the amyloid protein, or amyloid beta protein. Long before a person exhibits Alzheimer’s disease symptoms, he or she will build up plaques in the brain composed of the amyloid protein. Shortly after the development of plaques, tangles also will build up in the brain. Tangles are made up of the tau protein. The plaques and tangles together mount up over decades and lead to a short circuiting of nerve cells in the brain and the characteristic Alzheimer disease symptoms of memory loss and cognitive decline. In 1992, Dr. Selkoe and colleagues at Brigham Women's Hospital discovered that the amyloid beta protein is made by everyone throughout life, raising the question of why everyone doesn’t get Alzheimer’s disease. Further research by Dr. Selkoe and colleagues determined that genetic risk factors and environmental factors can contribute to the buildup of amyloid plaques in the brain. Currently, several companies are developing treatments that use antibodies to lower levels of amyloid protein in the brain. Promising clinical trials of these antibodies suggest that an anti-amyloid treatment may be available to patients within a few years. The Anti-Amyloid in Asymptomatic Alzheimer’s (A4) trial, is the first prevention trial for Alzheimer’s disease. The A4 trial, led by Reisa Sperling, MD at BWH, is currently enrolling patients in the US, Australia and Canada to evaluate whether an anti-amyloid agent can prevent the development of Alzheimer’s disease in patients who show evidence of amyloid on a PET scan but who are not experiencing Alzheimer’s disease symptoms. Learn more about Alzheimer’s disease diagnosis, treatment, research and clinical trials at Brigham and Women’s Hospital: http://www.brighamandwomens.org/alzheimercenter Read the Amyloid Beta and Alzheimer’s Disease Research Updates Video Transcript: http://www.brighamandwomens.org/Departments_and_Services/neurology/services/amyloid-beta-and-alzheimers-disease-research-updates-video-transcript.aspx
Просмотров: 5528 Brigham and Women's Hospital
PCOM Aneurysm Clipping Video - Brigham and Women's Hospital
 
07:44
Nirav J. Patel, MD, Department of Neurosurgery at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, performs surgery to decompress a communicating artery aneurysm (PCOM) which was compressing on a patient’s ocular motor nerve. The surgery was performed using micro-dissection techniques, allowing Dr. Patel to reach the aneurysm without cutting the tissue of the brain. The Center for Cerebrovascular Diseases in the Department of Neurosurgery provides diagnosis, treatment, care and outcomes for patients suffering from a wide range of cerebrovascular disorders. The Center is part of the Stroke Center at Brigham and Women's Hospital, a multidisciplinary program involves a team of neurosurgeons, interventional neuro-radiologists, neurologists, and radiation specialists, who offer a complete spectrum of therapies for the diagnosis and treatment of vascular disorders of the brain and spinal cord. Surgeons have access to the most advanced technologies, including a hybrid operating room that enables advanced imaging and multiple procedures to be performed simultaneously. Physicians are available 24 hours-a-day, seven days-a-week, for emergency consultations, referrals, and immediate transfers to Brigham and Women’s Hospital.
Просмотров: 13449 Brigham and Women's Hospital
Understanding Bariatric Surgery Treatment Options for Obesity Video - Brigham and Women's Hospital
 
06:29
Dr. Scott Shikora discusses bariatric surgery options for weight loss and metabolic treatment in patients with body mass index (BMI) of greater than 40 or BMI greater than 35 with a major co-morbid condition. Bariatric surgery can result in meaningful and sustainable weight loss that has long term health benefits. The Center for Metabolic Health and Bariatric Surgery at Brigham and Women's Hospital is a full service, comprehensive Level 1A Center of Excellence accredited Bariatric Center with the American College of Surgeons. Dr. Shikora is the Director of the Brigham and Women's Center for Metabolic Health and Bariatric Surgery View our New Patient Information video to learn whether bariatric surgery makes sense for you. In this video you will learn about the types of surgical procedures that are available, nutrition and lifestyle changes that are necessary before and after surgery, insurance and financial issues related to bariatric surgery, and how to take the next steps. View the New Patient Information video: http://www.brighamandwomens.org/weightlosssurgeryclass
Просмотров: 26766 Brigham and Women's Hospital
Doctor Discusses Vaginal Birth After Cesarean Video - Brigham and Women's Hospital
 
04:30
Katherine Economy, MD discusses the pros and cons of a vaginal birth following a cesarean delivery known as a VBAC at Brigham and Women's Hospital
Просмотров: 16978 Brigham and Women's Hospital
Endoscopic Sleeve Gastroplasty Weight Loss Procedure Video – Brigham and Women’s Hospital
 
05:07
Chris Thompson, MD, Director of Therapeutic Endoscopy at Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH), explains the endoscopic sleeve gastroplasty procedure, an option for patients who need to lose weight due to co-morbid conditions, but whose BMI does not qualify for them for standard bariatric weight loss procedures such as a sleeve gastrectomy or gastric bypass. These procedures are very effective in treating obesity. However, bariatric surgery is limited to patients with body (BMI) greater than 40 or greater than 35 with weight-related conditions, such as diabetes or heart disease. For obese patients who don’t meet this criteria, the endoscopic sleeve gastroplasty may be an option. Eligible patients will have a BMI between 30-35 and have attempted and failed at previous weight loss efforts. The endoscopic sleeve gastroplasty is a minimally invasive procedure in which an endoscope with a suturing device attached is inserted through the mouth to reach the stomach The stomach is then folded in on itself through suturing. The sutures make the stomach smaller. Learn more about the Endoscopic Sleeve Gastroplasty Procedure at Brigham and Women’s Hospital: http://www.brighamandwomens.org/Departments_and_Services/medicine/services/gastroenterology/services/endoscopy/default.aspx?sub=1 Read the Endoscopic Sleeve Gastroplasty video transcript: http://www.brighamandwomens.org/Departments_and_Services/medicine/services/video-transcripts/endoscopic-sleeve-gastroplasty-video-transcript.aspx
Просмотров: 8273 Brigham and Women's Hospital
Diagnosis and Treatment for Esophageal and Motility Disorders Video - Brigham and Women's Hospital
 
05:41
Robert Burakoff, MD, MPH, Director of the Center for Digestive Health at Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH), discusses diagnosis and treatment of esophageal and motility disorders such as gastroesophageal reflux disease. There are 30 to 40 million people in the United States that suffer from gastroesophageal reflux disease. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a condition in which the stomach contents leak backwards from the stomach into the esophagus. This can irritate the esophagus and cause heartburn and other symptoms. Other times the feeling of heartburn and indigestion can actually be due to an abnormality of how the esophagus contracts. There are various factors that can lead to abnormality of how the esophagus contracts. It can be that the esophagus is very weak, and the contractions are very slow and poor, and that allows the liquids and solids to hold up in the esophagus. It can also be that the esophagus contracts too strongly. In some cases, patients can lose a nerve at the end of the esophagus and, as a result, the esophagus can't relax, and liquids and solids will sit in the esophagus, and the esophagus gets bigger and bigger. At the BWH GI Endoscopy Center, as well as the GI Motility Center, clinicians evaluate patients to determine if they have a motility disorder, or if they have an increased acid reflux. A small tube is also used to pass through the patient’s nose into the stomach that allows the clinician to record how a patient swallows liquids and how well the esophagus contracts. Learn more about esophageal and motility disorders: http://www.brighamandwomens.org/gastroenterology Read the Esophageal and Motility Disorders - New Recommendations for Diagnosis and Treatment video transcript: http://www.brighamandwomens.org/Departments_and_Services/medicine/services/gastroenterology/esophageal-and-motility-disorders-video-transcript.aspx
Просмотров: 28471 Brigham and Women's Hospital
Hydrocephalus Recognition and Treatment Video – Brigham and Women’s Hospital
 
07:35
Mark D. Johnson, MD, PhD, Director of the Adult Hydrocephalus Program at Brigham and Women’s Hospital describes diagnosis and treatment of hydrocephalus. Hydrocephalus is a disorder resulting from abnormal accumulation of spinal fluid in the chambers of the brain. The most common symptoms associated with hydrocephalus include, headaches, memory problems, walking difficulties and urinary incontinence. It’s been estimated that ten to 15 percent of all patients in nursing homes have normal pressure hydrocephalus, but the vast majority of those patients don’t know it. The Adult Hydrocephalus Program at Brigham and Women's Hospital is investigating at several different areas of research pertaining to normal pressure hydrocephalus including factors associated with the development of the disease, impact of lifestyle, identification of disease biomarkers, development of new diagnostic tests and enhanced understanding of the underlying mechanisms of hydrocephalus. Learn more about hydrocephalus treatment and research: http://www.brighamandwomens.org/hydrocephalus Read the Hydrocephalus Recognition and Treatment video transcript: http://www.brighamandwomens.org/Departments_and_Services/neurosurgery/OurServices/hydrocephalus-recognition-and-treatment-video-transcript.aspx
Просмотров: 11294 Brigham and Women's Hospital
Liver Cancer: Robotic Hepatectomy Video - Brigham and Women's Hospital
 
04:32
Thomas E. Clancy, MD, Associate Chief of Surgical Oncology at Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH), performs a robotic hepatectomy, one of the first in Boston. BWH is a world leader in using state-of-the-art robotics to significantly shorten patient recovery time and to minimize or eliminate the physical challenges presented by traditional laparoscopic (minimally invasive) surgery. As one of the most experienced and diversified robotic surgery providers worldwide, the largest multispecialty robotic surgery program in Boston, and the first center in the Boston region to perform 2,000 robot-assisted surgeries, we are doing everything possible to provide patients with the most appropriate surgical option. Learn more: Robotic surgery - http://www.brighamandwomens.org/Departments_and_Services/roboticsurgery/default.aspx Liver cancer treatment- http://www.brighamandwomens.org/Departments_and_Services/surgery/general-and-gastrointestinal-surgery/liver-cancer.aspx?sub=5
Просмотров: 22037 Brigham and Women's Hospital
Circadian Rhythms and Your Health Video - Brigham and Women's Hospital
 
05:48
Frank A.J.L. Scheer, PhD, Director of Medical Chronobiology Program at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains the role of the circadian system and its impact on health and disease. The biological clock is composed of a central clock in the brain called the suprachiasmatic nucleus in the hypothalamus, as well as virtually all the cells in our body that contain the same molecular machinery that can generate 24-hour rhythms. Circadian rhythms are produced by the biological clock. Dr. Scheer explains how the circadian system regulates many physiological functions, including pulmonary or lung function, blood clotting and blood glucose control. The role of the circadian system may explain why asthma symptoms worsen at night, the frequency of cardiovascular events such as heart attack and stroke increase in the morning, and shift workers are at an increased risk for obesity and diabetes. Dr. Scheer also describes research studying the role of meal timing on weight loss and glucose control. Learn more: https://sleep.med.harvard.edu/research/labs/54
Просмотров: 6685 Brigham and Women's Hospital
Early Detection and Prevention of Alzheimer's Disease Video - Brigham and Women's Hospital
 
06:27
Reisa Sperling, MD, provides an overview on Alzheimer's disease dementia and a new groundbreaking study, the Anti-Amyloid Treatment in Asymptomatic Alzheimer's Disease (A4) Study. The A4 Study is the first study to examine early treatment of older adults at risk for Alzheimer's disease dementia -- with the hope of preventing memory loss before it begins. The clinical trial is for people without symptoms but whose brain scans show the buildup of amyloid plaques that may lead to Alzheimer's disease. Dennis Selkoe, MD from Brigham and Women's Hospital, led research that discovered that buildup in the brain of the amyloid protein is largely responsible for the degenerative effects of Alzheimer's disease. Dr. Sperling is the Director of the Center for Alzheimer Research and Treatment at Brigham and Women's Hospital and the lead investigator for the A4 Study. Dr. Selkoe is Co-Director of the Center for Neurologic Diseases at Brigham and Women's Hospital. Learn more: Read a white paper on Early Detection and Prevention of Alzheimer's Disease http://www.brighamandwomens.org/Campaign2014/images/alzheimers-disease-A4-study-white-paper.pdf Center for Alzheimer Research and Treatment http://www.brighamandwomens.org/research/labs/cart/default.aspx Center for Neurologic Diseases http://www.brighamandwomens.org/research/cnd/default.aspx
Просмотров: 7341 Brigham and Women's Hospital
Cartilage Regeneration Video - Brigham and Women's Hospital
 
05:42
Dr. Andreas Gomoll, orthopedic surgeon at Brigham and Women's Hospital, explains how cartilage is injured and procedures to repair cartilage defects, such as autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI).
Просмотров: 19380 Brigham and Women's Hospital
Dr. Pomahac Discusses Third Full Face Transplant, Charla Nash, Video - Brigham and Women's Hospital
 
04:47
In a press conference at Brigham and Women's Hospital on June 10, 2011, Dr. Bohdan Pomahac describes and shows an animation of the full face transplant procedure on Charla Nash, the Connecticut woman who was mauled by a chimpanzee in 2009. It is the third full face transplant procedure performed in 2011 at Brigham and Women's. A double hand transplant was also performed; however the hands failed to thrive and were removed.
Просмотров: 13495 Brigham and Women's Hospital
Causes and Treatment of Erectile Dysfunction Video – Brigham and Women’s Hospital
 
06:21
The Men’s Sexual Health Clinic at Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH) treats men with a range of sexual problems, including erectile dysfunction and ejaculatory dysfunction. Michael P. O’Leary, MD, MPH, Director, BWH Mens’ Sexual Health Clinic, discusses the most common causes of erectile dysfunction and treatment options, including medications and surgery. Learn more about the Men's Sexual Health Clinic and erectile dysfunction: http://www.brighamandwomens.org/Departments_and_Services/surgery/services/urology/male-sexual-health.aspx
Просмотров: 40730 Brigham and Women's Hospital
Advances in Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Treatment Video - Brigham and Women's Hospital
 
06:50
Howard L. Weiner, MD, Director, Partners Multiple Sclerosis Center at Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH), describes research focused on improving multiple sclerosis treatment and finding a cure for this debilitating autoimmune disease. Areas of BWH research include a longitudinal study of MS patients to understand various forms of MS and its long term impact, development of therapies to stop MS attacks, use of stem cells to regenerate the nervous system and development of a vaccine using the body's immune system. The Partners Multiple Sclerosis Center is a leading institution in the area of multiple sclerosis, providing comprehensive patient care, innovative technology, and ongoing clinical research trials. The clinical facilities at the MS Center are designed specifically with the MS patient in mind. A dedicated MRI scanner and an image-processing laboratory solely for MS patients, provide advanced imaging and quantitation of the MS process. The Partners MS Center is equipped to provide the best level of care for MS patients needing multiple sclerosis therapy and is committed to continuous clinical and laboratory research, in an effort to discover a cure for multiple sclerosis. Learn more: Partners Multiple Sclerosis Center http://www.brighamandwomens.org/ms What You Need to Know: Understanding Multiple Sclerosis http://healthhub.brighamandwomens.org/what-you-need-to-know-understanding-multiple-sclerosis
Просмотров: 10200 Brigham and Women's Hospital
Advancing Treatment of Rheumatoid Arthritis Video – Brigham and Women’s Hospital
 
06:33
Rheumatoid arthritis is the most common type of chronic arthritis caused by the immune system – affecting 1.3 million Americans. Symptoms and their degree of impact can vary greatly, and the earlier the disease is diagnosed and treatment begins the better. Fortunately, there have been exciting advancements in rheumatoid arthritis treatment, slowing down the progression of joint damage. Michael E. Weinblatt, MD, Co-Director, Clinical Rheumatology and R. Bruce and Joan M. Hickey Distinguished Chair in Rheumatology, Division of Rheumatology, Immunology and Allergy at Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH), discusses rheumatoid arthritis treatment along with an overview of promising research at BWH. The BWH Division of Rheumatology, Immunology and Allergy’s has the largest research funding base and investigative team of any rheumatology and allergy program in the country. It has helped to make significant advances in the treatment of arthritis and other joint diseases, including the recent development of a highly effective medication for rheumatoid arthritis.. Learn more: http://www.brighamandwomens.org/rheumatoidarthritis
Просмотров: 9092 Brigham and Women's Hospital
Aspirin Exacerbated Respiratory Disease: Recognition and Treatment Video – Brigham and Women's
 
06:33
Aspirin exacerbated respiratory (AERD), also known as Samter’s Triad or aspirin-sensitive asthma, is a chronic medical condition that affects patients with asthma. Along with the common symptoms of asthma, patients with AERD also experience recurrent sinus disease with nasal polyps and sensitivity to aspirin and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). AERD affects about 7% of all adults with asthma or about a million patients in the United States. Because each of these symptoms may be treated by different physicians, many AERD patients may remain undiagnosed for years. Tanya M. Laidlaw, MD, Director of the AERD Program at Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH), explains how AERD patients are evaluated, diagnosed and desensitized to aspirin and related medications. Dr. Laidlaw also describes ongoing clinical trials at BWH evaluating new approaches to managing AERD symptoms including the use of anti-platelet medications and dietary modifications. Learn more at http://www.brighamandwomens.org/aerd Read the Aspirin Exacerbated Respiratory Disease: Recognition and Treatment video transcript: http://www.brighamandwomens.org/Departments_and_Services/medicine/services/video-transcripts/aspirin-exacerbated-respiratory-disease-video-transcript.aspx
Просмотров: 6514 Brigham and Women's Hospital
Dallas Wiens Describes First Full Face Transplant Video - Brigham and Women's Hospital
 
03:05
Dallas Wiens, the nation's first full face transplant recipient, describes how he felt when he learned a face for transplant had become available and then waking up after the surgery and finding that he has lips, a nose, eyebrows, and more. Learn more about the his face transplant procedure at http://www.brighamandwomens.org/About_BWH/publicaffairs/news/facetransplant/facetransplantwiens.aspx.
Просмотров: 66876 Brigham and Women's Hospital
Understanding Thyroid Nodules Video – Brigham and Women’s Hospital
 
04:20
Trevor E. Angell, MD, MHS, Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Hypertension at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, discusses thyroid nodules. What are thyroid nodules? Thyroid nodules are discrete lesions within the thyroid that can be thought of as a mass or a lump. They can represent many different things, as opposed to just thyroid enlargement, which is sometimes called a goiter. Thyroid nodules are more common in older individuals and women are more likely to develop thyroid nodules than men. What are the risk factors for developing thyroid nodules? There are a number of things that may increase the risk of having a thyroid nodule, one of which is iodine deficiency, although that’s rare in the United States. People who have had radiation exposure to the area in the neck where the thyroid is located, particularly if that happened during childhood, are more likely to have thyroid nodules. Also, people with an underlying autoimmune thyroid disease, which is sometimes called Hashimoto’s, or lymphocytic thyroiditis, may develop thyroid nodules. What are the symptoms of thyroid nodules? Most thyroid nodules are asymptomatic and they're often found incidentally on different kinds of testing but a number of them can be either felt by a physician as a small firm lump where the thyroid is located in the neck. How are thyroid nodules evaluated? Almost all thyroid nodules are benign. The primary way to evaluate a thyroid nodule without removing it surgically is what's called a fine-needle aspiration biopsy. In this procedure a very small needle is put into the neck where the thyroid nodule is located and cells are collected for evaluation. It's a short well-tolerated procedure that's usually done under local anesthetic. Patients are able to go home afterwards with very few issues. When is surgery needed? Surgery can be required for the treatment of thyroid nodules in a variety of situations. If the thyroid nodule is found to be a malignancy, typically a thyroid cancer, the standard treatment at this point is a surgery to remove that nodule along with the thyroid in its entirety. There are other cases in which surgery will be necessary. Some nodules, even after biopsy can't be definitively described as benign or malignant. In this case the nodule may need to be removed surgically to determine what it is. There are also cases in which benign thyroid nodules need to be removed surgically because they are compressing in a place that's causing symptoms that aren't well tolerated. Learn more about treatment for thyroid nodules at Brigham and Women’s Hospital: http://www.brighamandwomens.org/Departments_and_Services/medicine/services/endocrine/Thyroid.aspx
Просмотров: 2863 Brigham and Women's Hospital
Raynaud’s Phenomenon Video – Brigham and Women’s Hospital
 
04:57
Marie Gerhard-Herman MD, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, discusses diagnosis and treatment for Raynaud’s phenomenon. Raynaud's phenomenon or syndrome is a fairly common condition where people have well demarcated pallor or cyanosis of their fingers, the tips of their nose, tips of their tongue, ear lobes, or toes, meaning there's a color change from normal to either white or blue in any of those areas. Most believe that this is in response to just your fingers being cold, but that’s not always the case. This response is a neurologic reflex and can happen with cold exposure elsewhere on the body. In most cases, when the body warms up the demarcated area goes away. This condition can be either primary or secondary. Primary Raynaud’s phenomenon is very common in females and often seen at the beginning of adolescents. Secondary Raynaud's phenomenon can be from a known injury such as frostbite or damaged blood vessels to the fingers. At Brigham and Women's Hospital, we have a group of doctors that take care of patients with Raynaud's phenomenon enabling accurate diagnosis in a single visit. Learn more about Raynaud’s phenomenon: http://www.brighamandwomens.org/raynauds Read the Raynaud’s Phenomenon video transcript: http://www.brighamandwomens.org/Departments_and_Services/medicine/services/video-transcripts/raynauds-phenomenon-video-transcript.aspx
Просмотров: 10726 Brigham and Women's Hospital
Uterine Fibroids Focused Ultrasound Video - Brigham and Women's Hospital
 
04:58
Follow a patient before, during and after undergoing focused ultrasound to treat uterine fibroids. BWHs Dr. Clare Tempany discusses the symptoms of fibroids, shows the steps of the procedure, and discusses its benefits.
Просмотров: 52517 Brigham and Women's Hospital
Liver Cancer: Hepatectomy with Radiofrequency Resection Video - Brigham and Women's Hospital
 
04:25
Hepatectomy is a surgical procedure for removing segments of the liver. It is an effective treatment for primary liver tumors including those derived from colorectal and other spreading cancers. In this presentation surgeons demonstrate resection using radiofrequency to minimize bleeding. To view full procedure, visit http://mdvideocenter.brighamandwomens.org/specialties/cancer/liver-cancer-hepatectomy-with-radiofrequency-resection
Просмотров: 180260 Brigham and Women's Hospital
Torn Rotator Cuff Procedure Video - Brigham and Women's Hospital
 
09:46
Torn rotator cuff procedure, performed arthroscopically, is introduced by orthopedic surgeon Dr. Scott D. Martin and demonstrated by Dr. Laurence D. Higgins, Chief, Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service, Department of Orthopedic Surgery at Brigham and Women's Hospital. Rotator cuff injury is one of the most common reasons for shoulder pain. Torn rotator cuff surgery can be performed using an arthroscope, a small tube shaped instrument that is used to look inside a joint in conjunction with other tools that are inserted through several small incisions, to repair joints using a minimally invasive technique. Brigham and Women's Hospital has a long tradition of providing comprehensive and innovative care for patients with orthopedic problems and joint diseases. Nearly a century ago, the Robert Breck Brigham Hospital, one of our founding hospitals, became the first teaching hospital in the country wholly devoted to arthritis and related diseases. Since that time, the Orthopedic and Arthritis Center has worked to establish one of the most highly regarded orthopedic and joint disease research and treatment programs in the world. Learn more: Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service: http://www.brighamandwomens.org/Departments_and_Services/orthopedics/services/sportsmed/default.aspx
Просмотров: 6714 Brigham and Women's Hospital
Sophia's Story: Placenta Accreta Video - Brigham and Women's Hospital
 
08:30
Placenta accreta occurs when the placenta—the organ that provides nutrients and other support to a developing fetus—attaches too deeply to the uterine wall, leading to complications during child birth. High-risk pregnancy or maternal-fetal medicine specialists in the Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH) provide specialized care for mothers with placenta accreta. Sophia, a patient of Daniela A. Carusi, MD, MSc, Director of Surgical Obstetrics, recounts her high risk pregnancy care for placenta accreta at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. Every family looks forward to a healthy pregnancy, and for the vast majority of women, pregnancy follows a fairly routine course. For some women, however, a high-risk pregnancy may present unexpected difficulties and challenges along the way. Having a high-risk pregnancy means that a woman has a greater chance of complications because of conditions that arise in her pregnancy, her preexisting medical status or external factors. Maternal-fetal medicine or high-risk obstetricians at BWH specialize in high-risk pregnancy to help you achieve the most healthy pregnancy and delivery possible. Brigham and Women's Hospital has been a world leader in helping women live longer, healthier lives. We have been consistently ranked as one of America's best hospitals on the U.S. News & World Report Honor Roll and as one of the top women's health providers in the country. Learn more at http://www.brighamandwomens.org/accreta
Просмотров: 2709 Brigham and Women's Hospital
Laparoscopic Burch Colposuspension Video - Brigham and Women's Hospital
 
08:11
Vatche, Minassian, MD, MPH, Chief of Urogynecology, and Sarah Cohen, MD, MPH, Director of the Minimally Invasive Gynecologic Surgery Fellowship Program at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, perform a laparoscopic burch colposuspension, a procedure used to correct stress urinary incontinence. Stress urinary incontinence is one of the most common types of incontinence and is characterized by urinary leakage during physical activities including coughing, sneezing, exercising, lifting, and laughing. As the condition progresses, it can become severe enough to happen with simple acts such as bending and walking. This condition is due to an anatomic weakness of the bladder neck which typically maintains the seal of urine during activity. Stress incontinence can result from a variety of conditions including vaginal childbirth, aging, menopause and obesity. As this is an anatomic condition, primary treatment may involve pelvic floor exercises and/or minimally invasive surgery. Learn more about treatment for stress urinary incontinence: Division of Urogynecology: http://www.brighamandwomens.org/Departments_and_Services/obgyn/services/urogynecology/Default.aspx Division of Minimally Invasive Gynecologic Surgery: http://www.brighamandwomens.org/Departments_and_Services/obgyn/Services/mininvgynsurg/default.aspx
Просмотров: 3211 Brigham and Women's Hospital
Healthy Breakfast Hash Video - Brigham and Women's Hospital
 
01:02
Healthy Breakfast Hash Eating a healthy breakfast can reduce the risk of obesity and high cholesterol, improve performance on memory-related tasks, and minimize impulsive snacking and overeating at other meals. Try this health breakfast hash recipe, which is high in protein and low in calories and saturated fat. Ingredients: • 2 tablespoons olive oil • 1 small onion, finely chopped • 6-ounce cauliflower, finely chopped • 6-ounce sweet potato, finely chopped • 1 red bell pepper, finely chopped • 2 cloves garlic, minced • ¼ teaspoon salt • 2 cups fresh baby spinach • ½ tablespoon sriracha sauce (optional) • 4 eggs, poached or soft boiled Preparation: 1. Heat olive oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium high heat. 2. Cook onion 3 minutes or until softened. 3. Stir in cauliflower and sweet potatoes, red pepper, garlic and salt. Cook for 5 minutes, stirring occasionally or until vegetables are tender. 4. Stir in spinach and cook 2 minutes or until wilted. 5. Stir in sriracha. 6. Serve eggs over hash. Source: BWH Food Service Nutrition facts: Calories: 206 Fat (g): 12 Sat Fat (g): 2.6 Trans Fat (g): 0 Carbohydrate (g): 16.4 Fiber: (g): 3.8 Protein (g): 9 Cholesterol (mg): 186 Sodium (mg): 328.2 Visit the Department of Nutrition at Brigham and Women’s Hospital for more healthy recipes: http://www.brighamandwomens.org/Patients_Visitors/pcs/nutrition/services/healtheweightforwomen/default.aspx
Просмотров: 28883 Brigham and Women's Hospital
Uterine Fibroid Treatment Video – Brigham and Women’s Hospital
 
04:37
Mobolaji Ajao, MD, Division of Minimally Invasive Gynecologic Surgery at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, discusses treatment options for women with uterine fibroids. Fibroids are very common muscle tumors of the uterus. Over the course of a lifetime, close to 70 percent of Caucasian women and more than 80 percent, of African American women will develop fibroids. Up to a quarter of women will actually have symptoms that will bring them in to seek a physician's evaluation. Symptoms of fibroids include heavy bleeding, pain or pressure symptoms and, occasionally, increased urinary frequency. Fibroid treatment options include watching and waiting, medical management, interventional radiology procedures and surgery. Brigham and Women's Hospital offers all of these treatment options. Most fibroids are discovered during a pelvic exam and this often triggers an ultrasound or some imaging modality to get a sense of the size and location of the fibroids. Alternatively, some women will present with symptoms such as heavy bleeding, pressure or pelvic pain that will trigger an imaging test. Most patients will respond to medical management of fibroids, but their symptoms return once they discontinue medication and they will end up needing some other intervention. Procedures performed by interventional radiologists may also used to treat fibroids. The most common procedure is uterine artery embolization (UAE) or uterine fibroid embolization which targets the blood vessels that feed the uterus. UAE leads to a decrease in the blood supply to the fibroid and overall shrinkage of the fibroid and the size of the uterus. The other option performed by interventional radiologists is magnetic resonance guided focused ultrasound. Focused ultrasound is limited to patients who meet certain criteria. Options for surgery include removing the fibroid or removing the uterus. Removing the fibroid can be approached in several different ways. If the fibroid is located completely inside the cavity of the uterus, it can be removed by an approach called hysteroscopy, where a camera and equipment are inserted through the cervix into the uterus; the fibroid is then shaved down from inside the uterus. If the fibroid is located in the wall of the uterus, fibroid removal can be approached by either an abdominal incision, similar to an incision for a c-section, side to side in the skin or up and down in the skin. Alternative surgical approaches include laparoscopic or robotic surgery. Both of these techniques include placing a small incision in the wall of the abdomen to remove the fibroids. The other surgical option for fibroids is hysterectomy. A hysterectomy can be performed vaginally, if the size of a fibroid is small enough. Learn more about minimally invasive surgery for uterine fibroids: http://www.brighamandwomens.org/Departments_and_Services/obgyn/services/mininvgynsurg/mininvoptions/fibroids.aspx
Просмотров: 2942 Brigham and Women's Hospital
Thyroid Disease in Pregnancy Video – Brigham and Women’s Hospital
 
02:43
Erik K. Alexander, MD, Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Hypertension at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains the relationship between thyroid disease and pregnancy. Both hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism can dramatically affect the success of a future pregnancy or an ongoing pregnancy. It’s very important that any expectant mother with thyroid disease be monitored very closely throughout pregnancy to minimize risk to the child.
Просмотров: 4365 Brigham and Women's Hospital
Carolina Bibbo, MD, Discusses Twin Pregnancy Video - Brigham and Women’s Hospital
 
12:16
A twin pregnancy carries specific risks and complications for both the baby and mother. High-risk pregnancy or maternal-fetal medicine specialists at Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH) provide specialized care for mothers carrying twins. Maternal-fetal medicine specialist Dr. Carolina Bibbo discusses types of twin pregnancies, complications and when to consult a high-risk pregnancy specialist. This video includes helpful illustrations that show the different types of twins. Every family looks forward to a healthy pregnancy, and for the vast majority of women, pregnancy follows a fairly routine course. For some women, however, a high-risk pregnancy may present unexpected difficulties and challenges along the way. Having a high-risk pregnancy means that a woman has a greater chance of complications because of conditions that arise in her pregnancy, her preexisting medical status or lifestyle, or external factors. At Brigham and Women's Hospital we have over 180 years of experience providing exceptional care for moms and babies: BWH maternal-fetal medicine experts specialize in high-risk pregnancy to help you achieve the most healthy pregnancy and delivery possible; BWH Center for Fetal Medicine and Prenatal Genetics provides comprehensive assessment and treatment for infants before birth; our Level III Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) is one of the most advanced facilities of its kind. Learn more at: https://www.brighamandwomens.org/obgyn/maternal-fetal-medicine/pregnancy-complications/twin-pregnancies
Просмотров: 8449 Brigham and Women's Hospital
Placenta Accreta: Diagnosis, Risks and Recovery Video - Brigham and Women's Hospital
 
12:05
Placenta accreta diagnosis. Daniela Carusi, MD, MSc, Director of Surgical Obstetrics in the Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine at Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH), discusses diagnosis, risks and recovery for women who develop placenta accreta during pregnancy. Placenta accreta occurs when the placenta—the organ that provides nutrients and other support to a developing fetus—attaches too deeply to the uterine wall, leading to complications during child birth. High-risk pregnancy or maternal-fetal medicine specialists at BWH provide specialized care for mothers with placenta accreta. Every family looks forward to a healthy pregnancy, and for the vast majority of women, pregnancy follows a fairly routine course. For some women, however, a high-risk pregnancy may present unexpected difficulties and challenges along the way. Having a high-risk pregnancy means that a woman has a greater chance of complications because of conditions that arise in her pregnancy, her preexisting medical status or external factors. Maternal-fetal medicine or high-risk obstetricians at BWH specialize in high-risk pregnancy to help you achieve the most healthy pregnancy and delivery possible; BWH Center for Fetal Medicine and Prenatal Genetics provides comprehensive assessment and treatment for infants before birth; our Level III Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) is one of the most advanced facilities of its kind. Brigham and Women's Hospital has been a world leader in helping women live longer, healthier lives. We have been consistently ranked as one of America's best hospitals on the U.S. News & World Report Honor Roll and as one of the top women's health providers in the country. Learn more at http://www.brighamandwomens.org/accreta
Просмотров: 4799 Brigham and Women's Hospital
Deep Vein Thrombosis & Pulmonary Embolism Video – Brigham and Women’s Hospital
 
03:39
Samuel Goldhaber, MD, Director, Thrombosis Research Group at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, discusses deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE). A deep vein thrombosis is a blood clot, usually in the pelvic or deep leg veins, occasionally in the upper extremity veins which is a potentially major medical problem. If the blood clot breaks off, its natural route of travel is through the heart and into the lungs, where it can cause a potentially deadly pulmonary embolism. A pulmonary embolism is a blood clot that is lodging in the pulmonary arteries, choking off the blood supply to the heart. It can cause right heart failure, collapse, and at times sudden death. The primary symptom of deep vein thrombosis is a Charlie horse in the calf that persists. Many people dismiss this as a muscle ache and don't realize it might be the sign of a serious condition that requires diagnosis and treatment. Unexplained breathlessness is the primary symptom of pulmonary embolism but it can also present as unexplained fainting or anxiety. The symptoms can also mimic pneumonia or heart attack. The symptoms can be very nonspecific at times making difficult to diagnose accurately. The primary treatment for DVT and pulmonary embolism is anticoagulation or blood thinning. Currently, there are several FDA-approved novel oral anticoagulants for the treatment of DVT or PE. The best way to prevent DVT is with a heart-healthy lifestyle and plenty of daily exercise. The American Heart Association recommends at least 30 minutes of exercise daily for at least six days per week. Learn more about deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism at Brigham and Women’s Hospital: http://www.brighamandwomens.org/Departments_and_Services/heart-and-vascular-center/diseases-and-conditions/deep-vein-thrombosis-and-pulmonary-embolism.aspx
Просмотров: 1854 Brigham and Women's Hospital
Intragastric Balloon Weight Loss Procedure Video – Brigham and Women’s Hospital
 
05:26
Chris Thompson, MD, Director of Therapeutic Endoscopy at Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH), explains the intragastric balloon procedure, an option for patients who need to lose weight due to co-morbid conditions, but whose BMI does not qualify for them for standard bariatric weight loss procedures such as a sleeve gastrectomy or gastric bypass. These procedures are very effective in treating obesity. However, bariatric surgery is limited to patients with body (BMI) greater than 40 or greater than 35 with weight-related conditions, such as diabetes or heart disease. For obese patients who don’t meet this criteria, the intragastric balloon may be an option. Eligible patients will have a BMI between 30-40 and have had no prior stomach (gastric) surgery. The intragastric balloon is a silicon balloon about the size of a grapefruit or a softball. The balloon is placed into the patient’s stomach through an endoscope and filled with fluid while the patient is under sedation. The minimally invasive procedure takes about15 minutes and in most cases patients will go home that same day. Learn more about the Intragastric Balloon Procedure at Brigham and Women’s Hospital: http://www.brighamandwomens.org/Departments_and_Services/medicine/services/gastroenterology/services/endoscopy/default.aspx?sub=1 Read the Intragastric Balloon video transcript: http://www.brighamandwomens.org/Departments_and_Services/medicine/services/video-transcripts/intragastric-balloon-video-transcript.aspx
Просмотров: 2886 Brigham and Women's Hospital
Focused Ultrasound for Essential Tremor Video – Brigham and Women’s Hospital
 
03:29
G. Rees Cosgrove, MD, Director of Epilepsy and Functional Neurosurgery at Brigham and Women’s Hospital discusses treatment for essential tremor, including MRI-guided focused ultrasound. Essential tremor is a problem in the motor circuit of the brain that prevents an individual from being able to perform smooth, accurate movements. Instead, patients experience a superimposed shaking of the limb. Over time the tremor worsens, making it difficult to perform many daily tasks. It's hard to write your name. It's difficult to use a keyboard on a computer or phone. It becomes very difficult to drink from a cup, eat, or use a knife and fork without the food going all over the place. Essential tremor can be treated either medically or surgically. Medical treatments may include either a beta blocker or primidone, medications that can be very helpful in reducing the tremor. When the medicines stop working, patients may be candidates for surgical intervention. Essential tremor has been with us throughout time. In the past, we made small lesions in the brain, in the motor circuit, to abolish the tremor. This required making an incision in the head, drilling a hole in the skull, and actually placing a radiofrequency probe down to a very specific target in the brain. And then, with that electrode or probe in the brain, we would stimulate and heat up the tissue to actually ablate and cause a little lesion within this motor circuit. Focused ultrasound is a very new technology that allows over 1,000 tiny ultrasonic emitters to be focused at a single point source. The focused ultrasound emitters are encased in a helmet. It's basically a spherical helmet where all the ultrasonic emitters are pointed at a single point source. When you activate all the emitters, you create energy at that point source and that can actually heat up and ablate the tissue. The beauty of the procedure is that the patient does not require any general anesthesia. It also doesn’t require any incision in the scalp or hole in the skull, so it’s completely non invasive. The effects on the quality of life in patients on whom we've treated is so dramatic. We actually see an abolition of the tremor of the hand while we're doing the treatment. Many patients just break into a smile when they look at their hand that isn't shaking anymore. It's been shaking for years and years, and now they look at their hand, and it's still and they can move it exactly how they want to and a big smile comes over their face. That's a pretty remarkable achievement. Learn more about focused ultrasound treatment for essential tremor treatment: http://www.brighamandwomens.org/Departments_and_Services/neurosurgery/NeurosurgicalTechnology/default.aspx?sub=1
Просмотров: 2605 Brigham and Women's Hospital
Inflammation and the Heart Video – Brigham and Women’s Hospital
 
06:43
Paul M. Ridker, MD, Director of the Center for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention at Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH), describes how inflammation can increase the risk of cardiovascular disease. Research conducted at BWH over the last 20 years has found that in addition to high blood cholesterol, inflammation is related to the development of atherosclerosis. Inflammation can be measured by monitoring blood levels of a molecule called C-reactive protein (CRP). BWH researchers found that middle-aged men with higher levels of CRP were at much higher risk of having a heart attack or stroke in the future. BWH researchers also designed a large clinical trial called JUPITER, which concluded that statins, cholesterol-lowering drugs, reduced the incidence of heart disease by lowering CRP levels. Recently, BWH has launched two clinical trials, Cardiovascular Inflammation Reduction Trial (CIRT) and Canakinumab Anti-inflammatory Thrombosis Outcomes Study (CANTOS), to determine whether individuals with high levels of inflammation are likely to have fewer heart attacks and strokes when receiving either methotrexate, an anti-inflammatory, or canakinumab, a monoclonal antibody which targets the inflammatory response. In addition to medication, exercise and diets rich in foods that lower inflammation, such as whole grains, fish, extra virgin olive oil, and nuts, can help lower inflammation. Learn more about the Division of Cardiovascular Medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital: http://www.brighamandwomens.org/cardiovascularmedicine Read the Inflammation and the Heart Video Transcript: http://www.brighamandwomens.org/Departments_and_Services/medicine/services/video-transcripts/inflammation-and-the-heart-video-transcript.aspx
Просмотров: 3261 Brigham and Women's Hospital
Emotional Well-being during IVF Video - Brigham and Women's Hospital
 
06:13
This video explains how couples can cope with the emotional issues they may face during in vitro fertilization and other fertility treatments. The Center for Infertility and Reproductive Surgery (CIRS) at Brigham and Women's Hospital is one of the premier infertility and reproductive medicine programs in the country. We offer the full range of treatments and have our own nationally-certified, full-service laboratories, capable of performing an array of sophisticated tests and specialized capabilities including embryo freezing. CIRS has been a leader in research that has advanced ways to improve reproductive health and maximize the chance of a successful pregnancy, while minimizing risks of triplets or greater multiples which can place mother and child at greater risk. Learn more http://www.brighamandwomens.org/cirs
Просмотров: 1977 Brigham and Women's Hospital
Surgeon Discusses Face Transplant Video - Brigham and Women's Hospital
 
02:58
In April 2009, BWH performed the second face transplant in the U.S. replacing the nose, hard palate, upper lip, facial skin, muscles and nerves. Surgeon Dr. Pomahac describes the 17-hour procedure.
Просмотров: 3449 Brigham and Women's Hospital
Sleeve Gastrectomy Video - Brigham and Women's Hospital
 
04:38
This video, featuring bariatric surgeon Scott Shikora, MD, Director, Center for Metabolic Health and Bariatric Surgery, features the sleeve gastrectomy technique involving the removal of the outer crescent of the stomach, resulting in a much smaller stomach, shaped like a tube or sleeve. To view full procedure, visit http://mdvideocenter.brighamandwomens.org/specialties/general-surgery/sleeve-gastrectomy View our New Patient Information video to learn whether bariatric surgery makes sense for you. In this video you will learn about the types of surgical procedures that are available, nutrition and lifestyle changes that are necessary before and after surgery, insurance and financial issues related to bariatric surgery, and how to take the next steps. View the New Patient Information video: http://www.brighamandwomens.org/weightlosssurgeryclass
Просмотров: 3319 Brigham and Women's Hospital
Cognition and Healthy Brain Aging Video – Brigham and Women’s Hospital
 
07:39
Kirk Daffner, MD, Chief, Division of Cognitive and Behavioral Neurology at Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH), explains what changes people can expect in their cognitive abilities as they grow older and what steps they can take to promote cognitive health throughout life. The Division of Cognitive and Behavioral Neurology, composed of specialists in behavioral neurology, neuropsychiatry, geriatric psychiatry, neuropsychology, and social work, offers care for patients experiencing difficulties with cognition, emotion, perception, or behavior as a result of neurologic disorders such as Alzheimer disease or other types of dementia, cerebrovascular disease, Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders, head trauma, attentional disorders, multiple sclerosis, epilepsy, and tumor. The Division has considerable expertise in the diagnosis and management of patients with cognitive difficulties, offering state-of-the-art diagnostic workups and treatment of all forms of dementia and mild cognitive impairment, including Alzheimer’s disease, to assist patients and families in determining whether changes in cognition are due to normal aging or disease. Learn more about cognition and aging: http://www.brighamandwomens.org/alzheimercenter Read the Cognition and Healthy Brain Aging video transcript: http://www.brighamandwomens.org/Departments_and_Services/neurology/services/BehavioralNeurology/cognition-and-healthy-brain-aging-video-transcript.aspx
Просмотров: 5465 Brigham and Women's Hospital
Polycystic Kidney Disease Video - Brigham and Women's Hospital
 
06:56
Peter G.Czarnecki, MD, Division of Renal (Kidney) Medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH), discusses management, treatment, and the latest research of Polycystic Kidney Disease. Polycystic kidney disease is one of the most commonly inherited disorders and it is the most common genetic disease of the kidneys. In the United States, this affects about 200,000 to 600,000 people. Polycystic kidney disease is a disease that takes years to develop and many individuals don't even know that they have PKD unless they have a strong family history of the disease. There are two major genes that can cause polycystic kidney disease, PKD1, PKD2. PKD1 is responsible for 85 percent of all polycystic kidney disease cases; PKD2, is responsible for 15 percent. We see, on average, the patient with the mutation in the PKD2 gene has a slower progression Typical symptoms of polycystic kidney disease are fullness and flank pain because kidneys with a large burden of cysts tend to take up a lot of space. Early satiety can be one of these symptoms; flank pain, occasionally; blood in the urine or, as we call it, hematuria; kidney colics; cramping pain; development of kidney stone disease; cyst rupture, bleeding into a cyst, or infection. At Brigham and Women’s Hospital our goal is to help people with PKD through many different routes. Research performed at Brigham and Women's Hospital will help future generations of patients with PKD by understanding the cell biology and biochemical aspects of the disease. For our present patients with PKD, we are invested in providing the best possible state-of-the art clinical follow-up, the best possible genetic counseling, and the possibility of inclusion into therapeutic trials with new drugs that may come on the market in the near future. Learn more about Kidney Health and Disease at Brigham and Women’s Hospital: http://www.brighamandwomens.org/kidneydisease Read the Polycystic Kidney Disease video transcript: http://www.brighamandwomens.org/Departments_and_Services/medicine/services/video-transcripts/polycystic-kidney-disease-video-transcript.aspx
Просмотров: 4352 Brigham and Women's Hospital
Epilepsy: Long-term EEG Monitoring Video - Brigham and Women's Hospital
 
07:36
The Comprehensive Epilepsy Program at Brigham and Womens Hospital provides epilepsy patients a service not available at other hospitals: EEG and video monitoring over the course of several days.
Просмотров: 14195 Brigham and Women's Hospital
Anterior Approach to Hip Replacement Video– Brigham and Women’s Hospital
 
02:47
Gregory William Brick, MD, MBCHB, Orthopaedic Surgeon in the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, discusses the anterior surgical approach to hip replacement. In a traditional posterior hip replacement, the patient is laying on their side. In an anterior hip replacement, the patient is in a supine position on their back. Through the anterior approach, the recovery time is faster and patients are generally much more comfortable post-operatively. If you are considering a hip replacement, you should consult a physician who specializes in anterior hip replacements for more information. Learn more about anterior hip replacements at the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at Brigham and Women’s Hospital: https://www.brighamandwomens.org/orthopaedic-surgery/resources/hip-replacement-overview
Просмотров: 1630 Brigham and Women's Hospital
Drug Desensitization Video - Brigham and Women's Hospital
 
04:04
Drug desensitization. Mariana C. Castells, MD, Director, Drug Hypersensitivity and Desensitization Center at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, describes the process of drug desensitization, a method in which a drug is safely re-introduced to a patient who has become allergic to the medication. During the drug desensitization process, physicians slowly reintroduce a drug to a patient by administering increasing concentrations of the drug. By gradually increasing the dose of the patient’s medication, the patient’s immune system is not activated, allowing patients to resume taking their medication. The drug desensitization process has allowed patients with cancer to continue on their cancer medication, to complete their treatment plan, and actually to have increased life spans. The drug desensitization process has also enabled patients with rheumatoid arthritis, Crohn’s disease, and other diseases that require monoclonal antibodies to tolerate their first-line therapy. Cystic fibrosis patients have also been successfully desensitized to antibiotics that they need to treat frequent infections. Drug desensitization is available to everybody who has an allergic reaction. In the past it was assumed that somebody who had a very severe drug reaction should abandon their medication, In fact, patients who are extremely allergic to medications, even those who have had anaphylactic reactions to their medication, can be very safely desensitized. Learn more about the Drug Hypersensitivity and Desensitization Center at Brigham and Women’s Hospital: http://www.brighamandwomens.org/Departments_and_Services/medicine/services/rheumatology/Services/Desensitizationforpatients.aspx Read the video transcript Drug Desensitization - What It Is & How It Works: http://www.brighamandwomens.org/Departments_and_Services/medicine/services/video-transcripts/drug-desensitization-video-transcript.aspx
Просмотров: 4078 Brigham and Women's Hospital